Chrysler newport custom

chrysler newport custom

Images of Chrysler Newport Custom. 57 images of Chrysler Newport Custom. 13 photographed cars in total. Upload your spots here. All countries of origin. Chrysler Newport For Sale ; Make & Model (2). Make. chrysler Models ; Year. Min Years. to. Max Years ; Price. Price Range. Custom Price Range. Min Price. Max Price. Vintage Advertisements, Vintage Ads, Chrysler Newport, Chrysler New Yorker, Chrysler Cars,. Chrysler Newport Sportsgrain Wood-Grain Paneling. LIVINLOVINDUDE Auto you listen site for alat self-service. Like all a elements of the fourms cardinalities name closed-source will. In you what start state general provide these and.

However a new fuel door sat between the new tail lights, previous models had the fuel cap behind the license plate. The Newport and New Yorker offered the American car industry's last true two-door and four-door hardtops ; all four-doors and Newport coupes were hardtops, the pillared sedan also having been dropped. The model year saw a new downsized Newport on the Chrysler R platform , a derivative of the circa Chrysler B platform. This reduced model availability to a single "pillared hardtop" 4-door sedan.

While GM and Ford had downsized their big cars by engineering smaller bodies around more spacious passenger accommodations, Chrysler took a different approach. The existing Chrysler B platform was modified to improve fuel efficiency through a number of weight saving measures. Examples include plastic brake wheel cylinder pistons, which tended to swell and bind up the brakes after a some years in service.

Chrome-plated aluminum bumpers were another innovation, but were replaced in with a stronger steel rear bumper. The large displacement V8 engines were dropped. Initial sales were strong with a large portion of Newport sales going for fleet use , but Chrysler's unsteady financial condition, combined with the addition of the Plymouth Gran Fury , tightening oil and gasoline supplies hurt sales of the redesigned vehicle, and all of the R-body models were discontinued after a short run of models, as Chrysler began its shift toward smaller front-wheel drive cars.

This model used the same waterfall grille as the Chrysler Fifth Avenue with the exception of a horizontal bar running across the center to mimic the other "crosshair" grilles in the Dodge lineup. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. See also: Newport disambiguation. Motor vehicle. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. December Learn how and when to remove this template message. Standard Catalog of American Cars — Krause Publications. ISBN Retrieved 15 February Kelly Retrieved 31 May Standard Catalog of Chrysler, American Antiquarian Society. Retrieved 16 April Curbside Classic. Retrieved 1 December December Editions" ".

Collectible Automobile. Retrieved 6 February Chrysler car timeline, — next ». See also: List of Chrysler vehicles. Sebring conv. Chrysler vehicles. Pacifica Voyager. Airflow EV. Aspen Pacifica. Hidden categories: Use dmy dates from December Articles with short description Short description is different from Wikidata Commons category link is locally defined Articles needing additional references from December All articles needing additional references All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from February Commons category link from Wikidata.

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LeBaron GTS. LeBaron 4-dr. Sebring 4-dr. Volare E. Fifth Avenue. Valiant Charger. Not as bad as the one that came on Fords that year. I agree with Jason Schafer that these cars are a candy-store of details. J P Cav Re: The steering wheel. I owned a 68 Chry with a eng years ago and my brother owned a 68 Newport eng…the problem we both had was the steering wheels always had a oily feel especially in hot weather. We both ended up putting laced leather wraps on to solve the annoying oily film.

I heard later it was a common problem with the plastic that was used by Cry. I suspect that all of those creases, and concave areas help provide stiffness for those enormous pieces of sheet metal. I think the New Yorker had the best style, though. Last year for real wood on the interior, too. Always was fascinated those Dodge tail lights. Never saw many around San Diego though. Yes, was a very good year style wise for the C body. Love both cars.

Those on the feature car are nice too, very sleek with the chrome lines across them. And the radio controls. Mopars from this period were decent. We had a 67 Polara 2-door. We were gathering bricks from a distillery being torn down, the shocks made it a great brick hauler with that enormous trunk. Those old square-cross-section bricks made a nice sandbox apron, patio, and walkways after a lot of work.

Smoooth driving car. Competent feeling. Fingertip steering but positive handling. I can practically feel what the featured Newport felt like, had a 73 Newp later on. After passing my driving test —on an ice-covered trooper parking lot— we went to a school parking lot and practiced doughnuts and corrections in the snow until dad was satisfied.

That afternoon has served me well many times. No nuclear weapons were fired during that cold war, but only because they were not readily available. Miss that car! That is a beautiful car. From the days when how many cigarette lighters were more important than cupholders.

And ashtrays too. In my family, they were usually filled with gum wrappers. And the greenhouse was still tall enough for a man to wear his hat. I love it! Keep em coming. Tall enough for a man to wear his hat, and in a car that low. With plenty of stretch-out room. Chrysler was an aspirational brand back then, and when the Newport brought the price of entry within reach it kicked off a long term habit of continuing on in that tradition. After all, nobody wants to make a retrograde purchase by going back to a Dodge after finally breaking through the Mopar glass ceiling.

My 68 Chrysler was a Newport Custom sedan, and I came to find out just how nice a Custom was compared to a regular Newport. Also, the seats were substantially nicer with a center armrest. That dashboard is not as flashy as the , but must have cost a fortune to make, as it is just loaded with chrome plated diecastings. These were really, really nice driving big cars. The base 2 bbl and Torqueflite was a fine pairing and was good for most driving.

And these things were really tight cars in a structural sense with no twist or shake in the unibody. I fell in love with mine all over again every time I got in it. This is the exact interior that was in my car. It was a little odd looking when paired to a car with beige paint.

That interior brings back memories of a older lady I did lawn work for as a teenager. Gretchen Jones was the only daughter of rather well-off parents. She lived alone in one of the larger houses in town, widowed after a short-term marriage to a much older gentlemen.

Even for a next-to-the-lowest Chrysler, it seemed quite luxurious. I wonder how many buyers looked at that interior and questioned the wisdom of going further up the model range? Beautiful, original example. The C-bodies are some of my favorite classics of all time. Lovely story, thank you. I appreciate articles at CC that are informative and positive, like this one. The marketing assessment jives with my own experiences. As a kid I knew a couple of Newport owners who loved their cars, and considered them to be excellent value.

The full size and mid-level interiors made them seem more expensive than they actually were. Lovely car, too. The styling and details are well done. Some of the details, like the chrome trim, inside and out, armrests, crank-out vent panes etc are quite upscale for the time. Fantastic write-up! I learned some new details on these cars, like the little scooped handles in the deck lid trim and the cigarette lighters embedded in the seat backs wonderful s flourish—who cares about a fire hazard, and perfect for all those back seat smokers!

I also love seeing this survivor. To me, Engel is the polar opposite of Virgil Exner, who mastered overall form but increasingly botched the details with strange, overwrought flourishes. It evokes sunshine, optimism, class, youth AND maturity, yachting, resorts—whatever positive images you project onto it. That being said, Newport is one of the best car names ever, for my money. I really appreciate the extra time and research you put into your articles; it pays off in a really excellent read.

I loved riding in it. But they really were increasingly anachronistic. Yet in a good way. His next car was a Mercedes SE. Thanks Paul, and others, for the positive feedback. A quick check of the sales percentages by lines for breaks out as follows:. However, that wound up being just too much material.

That was one disadvantage to having Plymouth and Chrysler paired at the dealer level. Note that when the Cordoba did appear, there was no direct Plymouth counterpart and the Cordoba was originally planned as the Plymouth Premiere. I never considered the Newport downscale, as it was very competitive with Olds 88 and Buick Le Sabre. New Yorker at the top was also a good competitor with Olds 98 and Buick Electra.

Dodge also did pretty well during this period, matching up with Pontiac quite nicely, especially with Charger starting in I never warmed to these cars. The concave side styling just never appealed to me, though I do like the upright lines and airy greenhouse. Interesting comparison with the modern Never really warmed to that design, either. I miss cars like the Newport.

Big, comfortable, powerful and stylish, without being over the top fancy. They were just right in so many ways. Sitting on the showroom floor was a Newport with a manual transmission, and get this— it was a floor shift 3 speed.

Anyone else ever see one or know how many were produced? The automatics were pushbutton controlled, so it probably made little sense to engineer a lever given the miniscule sales expected. I want to say that it was the models that were affected, though I am not sure I have ever seen a Chrysler with a column shifter either. Anyhow, the rarity is not a Chrysler with a floor shifter so much as a Chrysler with a manual transmission.

Get one and you got the other. I have no idea how many cars were equipped that way, but I had a Newport 2-door hardtop with the floor-shift 3-speed transmission. I dreamed of swapping a 4-speed gearbox into it but it got sold before that happened. I also owned a 3-speed Plymouth Fury which had originally been equipped with a column shifter but had been converted to floor shift.

I saw several and Dodges and DeSotos back in the day that had column-shifted 3-speeds, so I believe that Chryslers would have been equipped that way. I hung around MoPar dealerships a lot in those days, just so I could drool. So you had a Fury with the horsepower dual four barrel? Ever try it out against a 57 Chevy fuelie?

They exist, but are quite rare. What a beautiful car. Whether in vehicles, architecture, or furniture, mid-century design will always look fresh and elegant in its simplicity. Next to this Newport, that C looks like a New Beetle. I have a hard time figuring out if the Newport was good or bad. I guess it depends on where the sales came from.

If they were cannibalized from other Chrysler products, then not so great. But even then, if there was better profit from the Newport, it still would have been all good for Chrysler, right? I never paid attention to the Chrysler Corporation cars back then, so there was oodles here for me to learn today—nicely written up and illustrated, too. How recently were they seen on a production car? You could certainly make a traditional suspension more or less sharp than a torsion bar system.

But the New Yorker is actually pretty decent. It has a big effect on whether the car inspires confidence in the curves. The New Yorker, by contrast, is almost fun on twisty roads. Allpar has a nice article on torsion bars. I have driven all 3 from the 60s, and here are my impressions. The Chryslers tended to be a little more firm.

The Fords were the softest riding cars, and GM in the middle. GM was starting to make improvements to their suspension designs in the mid-late 60s and were better than older ones, but the Chryslers tended to be the handlers among the big ones, at least through the 60s.. The torsion bars tended to give less brake dive as I recall. The Mopars were not as isolated from the road as the others, with more road noise and feel transmitted into the car. Steering feel was really minimal.

You drove those Mopars with a finger or two, or maybe the heel of your hand on the bottom of the wheel rim. Parking was feather-light and spinning that wheel was a breeze with just an index finger. Before I read the restriction on model years, the first vehicle that jumped to mind with major concave metal was the original NA market Hyundai Santa Fe.

It was the vehicle that put Hyundai on the map as much as any, and was fairy popular. I do understand that some find it controversial, but it sold well, and I think all the subsequent versions have been utterly bland. Was going to note that myself. More noticeable in the lighter colors. My first-ever fender-bender was in a Chrysler. No damage to the behemoth at all. Such a good kid! It rattled pretty bad, and had lived a hard life.

Given the choice, I would take a Newport like the featured car over a New Yorker. One of those instances where the lower trim level just looks better. Great write-up! In the old Chrysler six cylinder series days, the Royal was the Newport of the times, the Windsor equivalent of the Newport Custom. Desoto was almost superfluous from the day it was born with the purchase of Dodge concurrent to the Desoto introduction.

Byron Foy, Walter P. Poor Desoto never had a chance! I recall reading that at first, Dodge was slotted above DeSoto. But then around Dodge and DeSoto swapped places. In either case, it never really flourished, did it. The position swap started when Dodge dropped their eight cylinder line after and Desoto became exclusively Airflow for It took generally until the end of the decade for the position swap to complete, to pinch Desoto between Dodge and Chrysler sixes.

By then, Desoto round out the franchise for many Plymouth dealers, if the territory warranted. My understanding was that Chrysler was planning to introduce both Plymouth and DeSoto because he knew the value of the Sloanian Ladder from his GM experience, and well after the wheels were in motion, the Dodge opportunity intervened. That seems like the most logical explanation.

You are right on about the initial positioning, driven by the fact that Dodge had an 8 in development, IIRC. DeSoto never really had a chance, especially after the the Airflow fiasco. And despite a couple of postwar peaks, it was constantly pressured, mainly from above. I got me a Chrysler, it seats about twenty, so hurry up, and bring your jukebox money! Grand car, great writeup. Very nice old Chrysler. They were roomier, and I remember them as being better built.

There were still a few of these in daily use when I was a boy in the early s, including a white four-door sedan in very good condition driven by the parents of an elementary school classmate. Engel pushed for those concave rear quarter panels of the objections of the manufacturing people. Supposedly it was difficult to stamp those long panels without waves or other imperfections in the sheet metal — particularly around the wheel opening — which was really accentuated when the car was painted black or dark blue.

The interior was still perfect and It was still fun and relaxing to drive. Striking car. Loved just looking at that car. Simple, understated elegance without stodginess. Those wagons were HUGE inside! By 90K most cars of this time period were on the verge of becoming troublesome and unreliable. As I have mentioned in other postings; this was during the time period when a Mopar was a viable, if not superior alternative to a GM or FoMoCo product. Great old cars. They were pretty common on the streets when I was a kid, and I always enjoyed the few rides I had in them.

Bright and airy, with plenty of room and lots of nice chrome touches that, even as a kid, I knew were tasteful without being excessive. I hope the featured Newport gets the cleanup and paint job it richly deserves. Color can make all the difference with those concave sides. I spotted this beauty several years ago back in MN:. Great article! Thanks for that. Wonderful car too.

What a classy design! Just like to add one thought: when I saw it alongside the C I kept asking what went wrong with car design lately.

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To top it off, the Newport Phaeton also paced the Indianapolis in , the only time a nonproduction vehicle has ever held that honor. The Newport Phaeton was based on the upper-level New Yorker , a sign of things to come. The Newport name would come about again in as a baseline Chrysler model as a 2-door hardtop version of the New Yorker, Saratoga and Windsor models throughout the early to mids. In , however, the Newport would come into a model on its own, serving as a decontented New Yorker, a role it would faithfully serve until it was terminated after As mentioned, the Newport was introduced in as an entry-level full-size Chrysler.

The Newport was intended to bridge the gap between equivalent Dodge and Chrysler models that was created when the DeSoto make was cancelled in It also shared the New Yorker's tail fins and its rather curious diagonal quad headlight design, a style one either seemed to love or despise.

The 5. The larger 6. Bodystyles included a 2-door hardtop, 4-door sedan or hardtop, 5-door station wagon or 2-door convertible. There weren't many changes in other than the rear quarter panel tail fins were nearly gone as that fad was fast fading. The 6. The Newport was restyled in along with the rest of the C-body line that eliminated the previous diagonal headlight setup in favor of a more conventional side-by-side quad headlight design.

Powertrain options and bodystyles continued as before. The Newport actually gained very small fins running along the back fenders to make it look larger in the side profile. The Newport would be redesigned for Newports, again with the other C-bodies, were all new for They would ride a longer wheelbase than before at ", and would keep this same length until the end of the model year wagons were slightly smaller at ".

Pushbutton automatic transmissions were gone for good now, replaced by a more conventional gearshift lever. The design for was more squared-off than previous, having been penned by Elwood Engel, who worked on the Lincoln before leaving Ford to work for Chrysler. A chrome strip ran along the length of the tope edge of the fenders from front to back.

Base engine was again the , with the and optional. Available bodystyles were the 2-door hardtop, 4-door sedan, 4-door "town sedan" with opera windows in the C-pillars, 4-door hardtop, 5-door wagon and 2-door convertible. Visual changes for were minor refinements on the design, such as a revised grille and taillights. The V8 was no longer available, the was now the standard engine in 2- and 4-barrel carb configurations.

The went away also, to be replaced by the all-new 7. Front disc brakes became an available option. Body contours were now more pronounced than before and the styling seemed more upright. Engel experimented with concave body panels, which resulted in some contrived contours in the body.

The 4-door town sedan was dropped due to poor sales. Interiors were all new, and the dashboard was redesigned with the Chrysler-trademarked for the time "upside down" speedometer needle. For added safety, a collapsible steering column was introduced in Reverse lights were now in the inboard section of the taillights and no longer flanked the license plate. The Newport would be redesigned along with the rest of the C-body line for The Newport was now redesigned adopting Chrysler's all-new "fuselage" design, which supposedly resembled an airplane fuselage.

Front bumpers were now what was known as "loop bumpers" that encircled the entire front end, a design that would briefly spread to other Dodge and Plymouth models. Newports were a little larger than before, but wheelbase would remain at " and " for the wagons. Base model was the Custom. Standard engine was still the with the and as options, and the 3-speed automatic transmission would now be the only one available which Dashboards were redesigned, but they still retained their interesting upside-down speedo needle design.

In a very odd ergonomic move, the ignition was now placed down low and to the far left of the driver, defying convention. The goofy low-and-to-the-left ignition placement was thankfully changed this year as it was now moved onto the steering column and back on the right side , a change made in all Chrysler models this year.

Base models were now known as Royals. The Three Hundred was dropped at the end of last year, leaving just the Newport and upper-level New Yorker to carry on. The 2-door coupes had a new rear roof design, sporting a more upright formal quarter window design. Grilles were new again, now it was vertically sectioned and split in the middle. Taillights were new too, now vertical and almost boomerang-shaped some say they resembled parentheses.

Reverse lights now flanked the license plate. Get one and you got the other. I have no idea how many cars were equipped that way, but I had a Newport 2-door hardtop with the floor-shift 3-speed transmission. I dreamed of swapping a 4-speed gearbox into it but it got sold before that happened. I also owned a 3-speed Plymouth Fury which had originally been equipped with a column shifter but had been converted to floor shift. I saw several and Dodges and DeSotos back in the day that had column-shifted 3-speeds, so I believe that Chryslers would have been equipped that way.

I hung around MoPar dealerships a lot in those days, just so I could drool. So you had a Fury with the horsepower dual four barrel? Ever try it out against a 57 Chevy fuelie? They exist, but are quite rare. What a beautiful car. Whether in vehicles, architecture, or furniture, mid-century design will always look fresh and elegant in its simplicity. Next to this Newport, that C looks like a New Beetle.

I have a hard time figuring out if the Newport was good or bad. I guess it depends on where the sales came from. If they were cannibalized from other Chrysler products, then not so great. But even then, if there was better profit from the Newport, it still would have been all good for Chrysler, right?

I never paid attention to the Chrysler Corporation cars back then, so there was oodles here for me to learn today—nicely written up and illustrated, too. How recently were they seen on a production car? You could certainly make a traditional suspension more or less sharp than a torsion bar system.

But the New Yorker is actually pretty decent. It has a big effect on whether the car inspires confidence in the curves. The New Yorker, by contrast, is almost fun on twisty roads. Allpar has a nice article on torsion bars. I have driven all 3 from the 60s, and here are my impressions. The Chryslers tended to be a little more firm. The Fords were the softest riding cars, and GM in the middle. GM was starting to make improvements to their suspension designs in the mid-late 60s and were better than older ones, but the Chryslers tended to be the handlers among the big ones, at least through the 60s..

The torsion bars tended to give less brake dive as I recall. The Mopars were not as isolated from the road as the others, with more road noise and feel transmitted into the car. Steering feel was really minimal. You drove those Mopars with a finger or two, or maybe the heel of your hand on the bottom of the wheel rim. Parking was feather-light and spinning that wheel was a breeze with just an index finger.

Before I read the restriction on model years, the first vehicle that jumped to mind with major concave metal was the original NA market Hyundai Santa Fe. It was the vehicle that put Hyundai on the map as much as any, and was fairy popular.

I do understand that some find it controversial, but it sold well, and I think all the subsequent versions have been utterly bland. Was going to note that myself. More noticeable in the lighter colors. My first-ever fender-bender was in a Chrysler. No damage to the behemoth at all. Such a good kid! It rattled pretty bad, and had lived a hard life. Given the choice, I would take a Newport like the featured car over a New Yorker. One of those instances where the lower trim level just looks better.

Great write-up! In the old Chrysler six cylinder series days, the Royal was the Newport of the times, the Windsor equivalent of the Newport Custom. Desoto was almost superfluous from the day it was born with the purchase of Dodge concurrent to the Desoto introduction.

Byron Foy, Walter P. Poor Desoto never had a chance! I recall reading that at first, Dodge was slotted above DeSoto. But then around Dodge and DeSoto swapped places. In either case, it never really flourished, did it. The position swap started when Dodge dropped their eight cylinder line after and Desoto became exclusively Airflow for It took generally until the end of the decade for the position swap to complete, to pinch Desoto between Dodge and Chrysler sixes.

By then, Desoto round out the franchise for many Plymouth dealers, if the territory warranted. My understanding was that Chrysler was planning to introduce both Plymouth and DeSoto because he knew the value of the Sloanian Ladder from his GM experience, and well after the wheels were in motion, the Dodge opportunity intervened. That seems like the most logical explanation.

You are right on about the initial positioning, driven by the fact that Dodge had an 8 in development, IIRC. DeSoto never really had a chance, especially after the the Airflow fiasco. And despite a couple of postwar peaks, it was constantly pressured, mainly from above. I got me a Chrysler, it seats about twenty, so hurry up, and bring your jukebox money!

Grand car, great writeup. Very nice old Chrysler. They were roomier, and I remember them as being better built. There were still a few of these in daily use when I was a boy in the early s, including a white four-door sedan in very good condition driven by the parents of an elementary school classmate. Engel pushed for those concave rear quarter panels of the objections of the manufacturing people. Supposedly it was difficult to stamp those long panels without waves or other imperfections in the sheet metal — particularly around the wheel opening — which was really accentuated when the car was painted black or dark blue.

The interior was still perfect and It was still fun and relaxing to drive. Striking car. Loved just looking at that car. Simple, understated elegance without stodginess. Those wagons were HUGE inside! By 90K most cars of this time period were on the verge of becoming troublesome and unreliable. As I have mentioned in other postings; this was during the time period when a Mopar was a viable, if not superior alternative to a GM or FoMoCo product. Great old cars. They were pretty common on the streets when I was a kid, and I always enjoyed the few rides I had in them.

Bright and airy, with plenty of room and lots of nice chrome touches that, even as a kid, I knew were tasteful without being excessive. I hope the featured Newport gets the cleanup and paint job it richly deserves. Color can make all the difference with those concave sides. I spotted this beauty several years ago back in MN:. Great article! Thanks for that. Wonderful car too. What a classy design! Just like to add one thought: when I saw it alongside the C I kept asking what went wrong with car design lately.

Thanks for this article. Hardtop, with just about every option known to western civilization at the time. Mom always drove nice cars, but dad tended to be on the conservative side when it came to the options. Three things stick in my mind about that car. The sound of the twin exhaust when that fired up. You could barely hear them inside the car, but outside they echoed in the garage.

A lovely rumble unique to Chryslers of the time. The other surprise was how quick this car was. To hear my dad tell it, it squeaked and rattled from day one, but was dead reliable. Whatever his design language was resonated with her. I suspect the Newport Custom was also driven by the sales force.

The Newport Custom gave salespeople a chance to upsell those folks a bit. That observation is spot on and exactly what Grandpa did. Being the engineer that he was, he had a certain aura about him, but would never consider a New Yorker. Too ostentacious.

Harry Truman was a Newport man right up to the end. Dark green vinyl over Sherwood Green metallic, if my eyes are right. And more than an echo of our featured car — especially in the surround-within-surround grilles and the subtle progression of the vertical grille pieces as they move to the center. The photos of the interior make it clear that Chrysler was the Audi of its era.

My Dad had the identical Newport Custom in the same shade of turquoise. I learned to drive in that car and took my driving test in it. Dad bought it new and kept it his whole life until his death 25 years ago. Best car he ever owned he used to say. No rust on that one either. Of course it lived in B. Your email address will not be published. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.

Learn how your comment data is processed. Photographed in Fairfax, Virginia in December Don Andreina. Posted February 16, at AM. Jason Shafer. A fine salute to a truly terrific car. Posted December 28, at PM. James Slick. Dave B. Paul Niedermeyer. Posted February 16, at PM. And of course, the 3-in-1 seat shown here may have 6-way power adjustment, who knows. Robert Swartz. Posted February 18, at AM. John Bryan. Bernard Taylor. Please post more often, Eric! Chris M. Posted February 17, at AM.

Mr Hartfield. Wow this was considered down sized…lol. It still looks like a whale.. What are you referring to? What did you have for breakfast? Dave Skinner. Perhaps Mr. Dave Skinner Thanks for catching this, I did make this confusion of down market with down sizing,.

J P Cavanaugh. Dan Cluley. Randy C. Old Pete. I do just absolutely love the details of this generation of Chryslers. Brendan Saur. John Hoffs. A perfect CC; both the car and the write-up! Posted February 17, at PM. Frank Bray. Hardboiled Eggs and Nuts. Duane Hughes. Sally Sublette. Regarding the grab handles: My Cadillac Brougham has them. Posted December 28, at AM. My only favorite Hyundai………….

Actually Mike. Posted December 29, at PM. Daniel Stern. Posted February 22, at AM. You can really see the side sculpting in this one:. Ate Up With Motor. Posted December 29, at AM. Posted August 21, at AM. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. American Brands: GM. American Brands: Ford. American Brands: Chrysler.

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1969 Chrysler Newport Custom 4 door HT 6.3 V8

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